Archive for August, 2010

Kathrine Stockett’s The Help

Thank you so much Sharla of Winter Write for giving me this book! I absolutely loved it!

Stockett weaves this story through the voices of three very different women:

Minny-a pillar-of-strength, no-nonsense woman who’s mastery of the kitchen regularly prevents her from loosing jobs due to her constant need to speak her mind.

Aibileen-surrogate mother to 17+ white children. After decades of waiting on white families she looses her only family, her son, when his white employers fail to see that he receives proper medical care following a farm accident. After this “a bitter seed is planted deep in her heart,” and she struggles to come to terms with the rules of her world.

Miss Skeeter-a young, freethinker who–at 22-years-old–holds a bachelors degree in one hand, but will fail to impress her mother until she has a ring on the other.

Upon returning home from college to find that her own, beloved maid has suddenly disappeared and those who know why are too afraid to answer her questions, Skeeter starts to see some of the injustices of her world and way of life. So after assembling a great deal of courage, Skeeter, Minny, and Aibileen set out to do their part to end the injustice by publishing a book filled with the stories of southern black maids.

It was good to hear, from an inside perspective, about life in the South during the 1960’s. For some time I’ve held on to all kinds of questions about that culture and time. This book answered many of them.

It blows my mind that after 20 or 30 years of work, a black maid can only dream of earning minimum wage. I wonder at the complexity of the love/hate relationship between a black maid and the white woman who is helpless without her, but feels superior to her nonetheless.

I marveled at the Catch22 of a black maid raising up white children—sometimes with more love and care than their own parents—knowing that eventually these white children would become white adults and learn to debase her for her race and profession. Perhaps the greatest tragedy of this situation is that the black maid must give so much to the care of a white family that her own family must go neglected. Her own children must forfeit the attention of their mother, because she is bound to someone else’s children.

My favorite part of this book must be contrasted against the prevailing facades, hypocrisy, and dishonesty of the white folk in this book. Aibileen tends a young girl who longs for her mother’s approval but goes largely ignored and brokenhearted, because her mother is too caught up in the foolishness of her society to provide attention for her daughter.

In a most loving and unselfish way, Aibileen finds the quiet moments to whisper in her ear that she is a special girl, a smart girl; a girl who can be confident and do great things. I just love Aibileen (and the real woman who inspired her character) for giving such a valuable gift to someone who could easily make her life miserable later. My hope is that instilling that little girl with confidence will help her make her own choices about race someday and not just parrot her parents’ views.

It’s clear that Stockett knew her characters well. She does a brilliant job of giving each woman her own distinct voice, heart, and feelings. I appreciate the clear view she provided of everyone in this book. I sympathized with all different perspectives: black maid, white southern belle, white trash, and redneck.

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End of Summer

A bit of nostalgia pulled this poem out of me:

Now the grass may recover;
Now the swings may rest.
Dormant rooms will reawaken,
And the buses will resume.

The world is turning us,
And leaving our merry frolic-time
To catch it’s breath.
But, Oh! It was fun while we were blithe.

Writing for Charity Event

If you are an aspiring writer and will be anywhere near Salt Lake City, Ut on Saturday (the 21st), you must check out an amazing opportunity hosted by one of my favs–author Shannon Hale (the Goose Girl, Book of a Thousand Days).

The day event is $70. You may bring a manuscript to hash over with the likes of James Dashner (the Maze Runner, 13th Reality), Bree Dispain (the Dark Divine), Anne Bowen (What Do Teachers Do After You Leave School, I Loved You Before You Were Born), and several others. Or you can just listen in if you’re shy about your work. The evening event is $10 and features live music, the comedians of Divine Comedy, and an all-star author’s panel including Brandond Mull (Fablehaven Series) and Shannon Hale herself!

I am dying that I did not hear about this before today! Alas, I am now locked into unchangeable plans and cannot attend. But I am already looking forward to next year and will be the first in line for tickets!!

Please click here to read more about this event, or click here for the event website and ticket info.